Come of Age: The Case for Elderhood in a Time of Trouble

Come of Age: The Case for Elderhood in a Time of Trouble

Talk
Monday, May 20, 2019 - 19:00 to 21:00
Spiritual
Inspiring
Alternatives says: 
“Getting older is inevitable, becoming an elder is a skill. ” Stephen Jenkinson
Description: 
The sages seem to be departing. Elections enthrone Change, that’s all. The tribal lines deepen.  And there’s the weather, and the waters. The appearance of it all is this: We’d rather be defeated than persuaded. Perhaps we will be.
In a time like this, contemplation tethered to the troubled world is courageous.
Contemplative sorrow: that’s the kind that is willing to learn the trouble of its time in a way that principled anxiety is not. Contemplation worthy of the troubled time: that is something to bequeath to the young among us. Unvanquished give-a-shit: that is something the old among us might be nourished to see.
Elders are a sentinel species for humanness, and like other forms of life in our corner of the world they’ve mysteriously gone missing. Young people are, often involuntarily, looking for them, and they can’t find them. How about this: old people are looking for them too. ..Stephen is making the case for elderhood, not for easy agedness mostly by wondering what happened. Because something happened. Something happened to ancestors and elders and honour.
Trade faith and hope for a stranger love of life, one that befriends the darkening sky by learning it. We might yet craft an eloquence that serves the terrible beauty we are about to bequeath to the young. Consequence, after all, is the true companion of grown ups.
There’s work to be done, and there’s an old wisdom to be learned where there used to be the wisdom of old.”
 
About the speaker, Stephen Jenkinson

Culture activist, teacher, author ~ Stephen teaches internationally and is the creator and principal instructor of the Orphan Wisdom School, co-founded the school with Nathalie Roy in 2010, convening semi-annually in Deacon, Ontario, and in northern Europe. He has Master’s degrees from Harvard University (Theology) and the University of Toronto (Social Work). Apprenticed to a master storyteller when a young man, he has worked extensively with dying people and their families, is former programme director in a major Canadian hospital, former assistant professor in a prominent Canadian medical school. He is also a sculptor, traditional canoe builder whose house won a Governor General’s Award for architecture. Since co-founding Nights of Grief and Mystery with Gregory Hoskins in 2015, he has toured this musical/tent show revival/storytelling/ceremony of a show across North America, U.K. and Europe and Australia and New Zealand.

He is the author of Come of Age: The Case for Elderhood in a Time of Trouble (2018), the award-winning Die Wise: A Manifesto for Sanity and Soul (2015), Homecoming: The Haiku Sessions (a live teaching from 2013), How it All Could Be: A workbook for dying people and those who love them (2009), Angel and Executioner: Grief and the Love of Life – (a live teaching from 2009), and Money and The Soul’s Desires: A Meditation (2002). He is contributing author to Palliative Care – Core Skills and Clinical Competencies (2007).

Stephen Jenkinson is also the subject of the feature length documentary film Griefwalker (National Film Board of Canada, 2008, dir. Tim Wilson), a portrait of his work with dying people, and Lost Nation Road, a shorter documentary on the crafting of the Nights of Grief and Mystery tours (2019, dir. Ian Mackenzie).

 

 
Timetable: 
18:30
Doors open
19:00
Talk commences
21:00
Book signing
Venue: